Devastating flooding in South Africa this week, as well as some other extreme weather events around the continent connected to human-induced climate change, pose a health threat to marine and terrestrial wildlife, according to biodiversity experts.

Africa has already been suffering several climate-related problems over the last year: relentless coastal flooding has been followed by tornadoes in the South, extreme temperatures in Western and Northern regions and a crippling drought now affecting Eastern, Central and Horn of Africa.

Conservationists and conservationists consider it vital to protect species from weather such as these due to climate change.

“Climate change is disrupting ecosystems and affecting the survival and suitability of species to live in their usual habitats,” said Shyla Raghav, Director of Climate Change at Conservation International.”Climate change is disrupting ecosystems and affecting the survival and suitability of species to live in their usual habitats,

Several species, including Africa’s famous “big-five” land animals and other land and marine life, are suffering from considerable population loss.

Ornithologist Paul Matiku, head of the biodiversity monitoring group Nature Kenya told MailOnline:’Changing rainfall patterns and heightened temperatures are having serious impact on the bird population.

Africa

Africa is the world’s second-largest and second-most populous continent, after Asia in both cases. At about 30.3 million km2 including adjacent islands, (wikipedia)

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is an intergovernmental body of the United Nations responsible for advancing knowledge on human-induced climate change. (wikipedia)

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